Madeline Gordon’s family was rocked by her sons cancer diagnosis, now they want to help others | The Examiner

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While Madeline Gordon admits that the past 18 months of her life have been nothing short of a nightmare, she tries to stay positive. The 40-year-old Newstead mother of three and her partner Will were unaware of the despair they were about to go through until their then three-year-old son Alfred suffered an asthma attack on April 5 last year, which she initially experienced. thought it was an asthma attack. year. READ MORE: An overdue tribute to the ‘remarkable’ native chicken Less than 48 hours later, he was flown to Melbourne for treatment of a mass, likely cancer, that could have collapsed his lungs at any moment, rendering him unable to breathe or resuscitated turn into. Gordon and Alfred flew to COVID Melbourne on Sunday night. Mrs Gordon followed the next morning with one child and the eldest son stayed with relatives in Tasmania until there was a better understanding of the situation. From that moment on, the lives of the Gordon, Madeline, Will, Alfred, Remy, five, and then three-month-old Margaret, were turned upside down. Due to the timing of what was eventually diagnosed as T-cell lymphoma for Alfred, the fact that he would have to travel to a soon to be devastated and locked down by COVID-19 complicated Melbourne, which was already a delicate situation. After four months of extensive treatment to try and get over the cancer, the Gordon family was ready to come home. Eldest child Remy returned home with Mrs. Gordon’s parents, ready to go to school after a two week quarantine period, with the rest of the family to follow. But Melbourne shouldn’t have declared itself in a state of disaster, as COVID cases approached 1,000 each day. Instead, Ms and Mr Gordon and their two youngest children had to remain in Melbourne so Alfred could continue his treatment uninterrupted by COVID travel restrictions. Those restrictions meant that Mrs. and Mr. Gordon would hardly see each other during Alfred’s hospitalization, but for a brief period of “switching” in Albert’s surveillance in the hospital parking lot. It was also the only time Mr. Gordon would see his month-old daughter Margaret, and the only chance Mr. and Mrs. Gordon had to embrace in the midst of what they were going through. READ MORE: ‘I couldn’t get away’: For Lucy, fleeing family violence is a lifelong struggle Finally, the family was able to return to their home in Newstead in February, 10 months after flying to Melbourne for the first time to take the life of their son to save. It wasn’t, and still isn’t, the end of Albert’s treatment journey, but the Gordons look forward to a life where Albert is no longer actively treated – which they can currently do from their Tasmanian home. And despite the turmoil they got into, Mrs. Gordon said it was all about moving forward. She said her eyes had been opened to what it means to be diagnosed with cancer in a family member, and expressed her sincere condolences to anyone placed in the same position. And by holding her head high and staying positive, Ms. Gordon was defiant about how her family could use their experience to help others. “We wanted to give something back to move forward and move treatment forward so it can be kinder and more effective for all the kids going through this.” Ms. Gordon thought the best way to give back was to share her story and start an online auction to raise money for The Kids’ Cancer Project. She said she chose that charity in particular because it took into account how all childhood cancer journeys are different and was representative of all the families her family had met while Alfred was being treated at the Melbourne hospital. She said she chose that charity in particular because it took into account how all cancer trips are different and was representative of all the families her family had met while Albert was being treated at the Melbourne hospital. “Our situation brought us to this point of understanding, and the charity auction was how we wanted to celebrate my 40th birthday and end 2021. We want that to be very positive.” The auction is open for donations until November 8, and has received over 60 to date. Ms. Gordon hopes to raise about $75,000, but isn’t sure how high that total will be. Bidding on the auction donations, which will include unique artwork and exclusive accommodation in places across Tasmania, will begin on December 8th and run through December 15th. More information is available at madelinesstory.com.au. What do you think? Send us a letter to the editor:

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While Madeline Gordon admits that the past 18 months of her life have been nothing short of a nightmare, she tries to stay positive.

The 40-year-old Newstead mother of three and her partner Will were unaware of the despair they were about to go through until their then three-year-old son Alfred suffered an asthma attack on April 5 last year, which she initially experienced. thought it was an asthma attack. year.

Less than 48 hours later, he was flown to Melbourne for treatment of a mass, likely cancer, that could have collapsed his lungs at any moment, making it impossible for him to breathe or be resuscitated.

Gordon and Alfred flew to COVID Melbourne on Sunday night. Mrs Gordon followed the next morning with one child and the eldest son stayed with relatives in Tasmania until there was a better understanding of the situation.

From that moment on, the lives of the Gordon, Madeline, Will, Alfred, Remy, five, and then three-month-old Margaret, were turned upside down.

Due to the timing of what was eventually diagnosed as T-cell lymphoma for Alfred, the fact that he would have to travel to a soon to be devastated and locked down by COVID-19 complicated Melbourne, which was already a delicate situation.

After four months of extensive treatment to try and get over the cancer, the Gordon family was ready to come home.

Instead, Ms and Mr Gordon and their two youngest children had to remain in Melbourne so Alfred could continue his treatment uninterrupted by COVID travel restrictions.

Those restrictions meant that Mrs. and Mr. Gordon would hardly see each other during Alfred’s hospitalization, but for a brief period of “switching” in Albert’s surveillance in the hospital parking lot.

It was also the only time Mr. Gordon would see his month-old daughter Margaret, and the only chance Mr. and Mrs. Gordon had to embrace in the midst of what they were going through.

Finally, the family was able to return to their home in Newstead in February, 10 months after flying to Melbourne for the first time to save their son’s life.

It wasn’t, and still isn’t, the end of Albert’s treatment journey, but the Gordons look forward to a life where Albert is no longer actively treated – which they can currently do from their Tasmanian home.

And despite the turmoil they got into, Mrs. Gordon said it was all about moving forward.

She said her eyes had been opened to what it means to be diagnosed with cancer in a family member, and expressed her sincere condolences to anyone placed in the same position.

And by holding her head high and staying positive, Ms. Gordon was defiant about how her family could use their experience to help others.

We were totally exhausted, but determined.

Madeline Gordon

“We wanted to give something back to move forward and move treatment forward so it can be kinder and more effective for all the kids going through this.”

Ms. Gordon thought the best way to give back was to share her story and start an online auction to raise money for The Kids’ Cancer Project.

She said she chose that charity in particular because it took into account how all childhood cancer journeys are different and was representative of all the families her family had met when sheAlfred was treated at the hospital in Melbourne.

She said she chose that charity in particular because it took into account how all cancer trips are different and was representative of all the families her family had met while Albert was being treated at the Melbourne hospital.

Every time you come back? [what happened] it’s hard, and we’re still going through it now, so it’s very raw, but there are great people around us and in the community.

Madeline Gordon

“Our situation brought us to this point of understanding, and the charity auction was how we wanted to celebrate my 40th birthday and end 2021,we want it to be really positive.”

The auction is open for donations until November 8, and has received over 60 to date. Ms. Gordon hopes to raise about $75,000, but isn’t sure how high that total will be.

Bidding on the auction donations, which will include unique artwork and exclusive accommodation at sites across Tasmania, will begin on December 8th and run through December 15th. More information is available at madelinesstory.com.au.

What do you think? Send us a letter to the editor:

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