Pediatricians, parents eager to get kids vaccinated

A mother KETV NewsWatch 7 spoke to said her children are in the Millard school district. Her fourth grader contracted COVID-19 after school started this fall. She said this is just one of the reasons she will have her 9- and 5-year-old vaccinated. On August 18, just five days into the new school year, Montclair Elementary announced that one of its classrooms would be shut down due to positive COVID-19 cases. Amanda Dethloff’s daughter was one of them. “It’s been hard, especially the 14 days that my daughter had to sit out of her sport was very hard for her. Fortunately, she didn’t get very sick,” said Dethloff. Dethloff doesn’t want her to go through that again. Her 12-year-old has already been vaccinated, now she says it’s time for her 9- and 5-year-old to get the shot. “I’m going to feel a little better knowing their bodies have some sort of exposure to COVID if they got it then hopefully they’d be a little less affected by the virus,” Dethloff said. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention approved the Pfizer dose for emergency use in 5- to 11-year-olds, something Dethloff has been eagerly waiting for. The children’s hospital says it has already received the shipment. “We’ve waited so long for a safe and effective vaccine and it’s finally here. It’s a big deal,” said Dr Hannah Donaldson, a pediatrician pediatrician. Donaldson, of the Children’s Hospital, says not all pediatric cases of COVID -19 are mild — some end up in hospital. Donaldson says she wants parents to know the shot is safe for their kids. “The risks of not getting vaccinated, the risks of actual COVID-19 infection far outweigh the risks of getting the COVID-19 vaccine,” Donaldson said. Dethloff says the risk of potential side effects from the vaccine is one she’s willing to take. “I trust science. And I know there’s a risk to everything we do in our lives. I mean, driving the car, there’s a risk to that,” Dethloff said.

A mother KETV NewsWatch 7 spoke to said her children are in the Millard school district. Her fourth grader contracted COVID-19 after school started this fall. She said this is just one of the reasons she will have her 9- and 5-year-old vaccinated.

On August 18, just five days into the new school year, Montclair Elementary announced that one of its classrooms would be shut down due to positive COVID-19 cases.

Amanda Dethloff’s daughter was one of them.

“It was tough, especially the 14 days my daughter had to sit out of her sport was very tough for her. Luckily she didn’t get very sick,” said Dethloff.

Dethloff doesn’t want her to go through that again. Her 12-year-old has already been vaccinated, now she says it’s time for her 9- and 5-year-old to get the shot.

“I’ll feel a little better knowing their bodies have some sort of exposure to COVID if they got it then hopefully they’d be a little less affected by the virus,” Dethloff said.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have approved the Pfizer dose for emergency use in 5- to 11-year-olds, something Dethloff has been eagerly waiting for. The children’s hospital says it has already received the shipment.

“We’ve waited so long for a safe and effective vaccine and it’s finally here. It’s a big deal,” said Dr. Hannah Donaldson, Pediatrician Pediatrician.

Donaldson, of the Children’s Hospital, says not all pediatric cases of COVID-19 are mild — some end up in the hospital. Donaldson says she wants parents to know the shot is safe for their kids.

“The risks of not getting vaccinated, the risks of actual COVID-19 infection far outweigh the risks of getting the COVID-19 vaccine,” Donaldson said.

Dethloff says the risk of potential side effects from the vaccine is one she’s willing to take.

“I trust science. And I know there’s a risk to everything we do in our lives. I mean, driving the car, there’s a risk to that,” Dethloff said.

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