UPMC, AHN pediatricians answer questions on 5-to-11-year-olds and COVID-19 vaccination

ABOUT THE SAFETY OF VACCINE A POLL FROM THE KAISER FAMILY FOUNDATION TALKED WITH SOME PARENTS AGED FIVE TO Eleven OF THOSE PARENTS WHO WERE ALREADY TO GET THE COVID-19 VACCINE TO PROTECT THEIR CHILDREN TO KNOW THESE PARENTS WOULD BE OLD THEY EXPERIENCE AS A SAFETY QUESTION. FEAR OF POTENTIAL LONG-TERM EFFECTS. WE TALK TO PEDIATRICS OF BOTH UPMANC D M.AH THAT THE BENEFITS MUCH EXCEED THE RISKS. THE DOSAGE FOR THE PEDIATRIC COVID-19 VACCINE IS ONE 1/3TH OF ADULT ASND, SO WHEN WE EXAMINE WSA ACTUALLY REDUCED EVEN LOCAL SIDE EFFECTS SUCH AS ARMY-HEAD OR FEVER OR Slightly fatigued YOU COMPARE TO THE ACTUAL SAME DISEASE, THE BENEFIT IS MUCH EXCEEDING THE RISKS YOU MAY SEE DR. PAMELA SHOWMER, SHE IS DIRECTOR OF SAFETY QUALITY AND OUTCOME FOR UPMC CHILDREN’S COMMUNITY PEDIATRIC ON THE SAFETY OF THE COVID-19 VACCINE. WE ALSO SPEAK METR. D NL. KATYAR. HE IS AN AHN CHILDREN’S TOUR. HE SAYS THIS IS HOW THE VACCINES WORK WHEN THERE ARE COMPLICATIONS IN THE FIRST FEW WEEKS, NOT AFTER YEARS. THE VACCINE HAS BEEN PROVEN SAFE CURRENTLY PROVEN EFFECTIVE. OVER 430 MILLION DOSES HAVE BEEN GIVEN. IN THENI UTED STILL STILL STATES. WITH KNOWN MILD SIDE EFFECTS SUCH AS WEAKING ARMS LOW FEVER A LITTLE FATIGUE HEADACHE AND THERE ARE VERY FEW REPORTS OF SERIOUS LONGER TERM COMPLICATIONS DUE TO THE VACCINE. BOTH PHYSICIANS CONTRAST THE RISK OF VACCINE SIDE EFFECTS WITH THE KNOWN HAZARDS AND DAMAGE OF THE COVID-19 VIRUS. THEY SAY IF YOU HAVE FURTHER QUESTIONS TO TALK TO YOUR PEDIATR FAMILY

UPMC, AHN pediatricians answer questions about 5- to 11-year-olds and COVID-19 vaccination

Both doctors compare the low risk of side effects from the vaccine with the known dangers of COVID-19. They say that if parents have questions, they should discuss things with the family pediatrician.

Updated: 6:52 PM EST Nov. 12, 2021

Pittsburgh’s Action News 4 spoke with pediatricians from both UPMC and AHN about questions parents of 5- to 11-year-olds may have about vaccinating their children to protect them from COVID-19. View the full report in the video player above. As to whether they should consider getting their kids vaccinated at a school clinic, other clinics, a pharmacy, or their pediatrician’s office, the doctors we spoke to will help them get the vaccine in the environment that works best for you. “Depending on the site, there is definitely availability. You just have to try and watch, make those calls. I’d say, on average we’ll be away for maybe a week or ten days, maybe (for) your ideal location. But if you look, its there are already appointments this weekend,” said Dr. Pamela Schoemer, Director of Safety, Quality, and Outcomes for UPMC Children’s Community Pediatrics.Dr. Ned Ketyer, an AHN pediatrician, said: “If parents have paid close attention and they feel comfortable giving their child the vaccine in any setting, they should. I have to say that most parents feel it. We feel most comfortable going to the pediatrician. We understand it’s a familiar place with familiar faces and kids seem to do better and parents seem to like that more.” What about kids who are big for their age or whose birthdays may soon place them outside the 5 to 11 age group? Ketyer said: “I understand why parents would ask that question, but the vaccine isn’t based on a person’s weight. It’s based on a person’s age and their ability to mount an immune response as a result of getting a vaccine. And that’s age related, not weight related I got that question about 11 year olds about to turn 12: “Should I wait for the vaccine?” The answer is no. If you have the chance to get the vaccine, make sure your child gets the vaccine.” Schoemer said: “We’re following the data and the way it’s been studied. It’s really based on age, not size. Our immune system doesn’t respond based on our size, so we’re going by age. So if you have an 11- You should get an 11-year-old vaccine (dose) and not wait until after your birthday, because the sooner you get vaccinated, the sooner you’ll be protected.” A poll by the Kaiser Family Foundation spoke to parents of 5- to 11-year-olds. Those who are hesitant about the COVID-19 vaccine to protect their children worry about balancing safety and fear of longer-term risks. Schoemer said: “With this, the benefits far outweigh the risks. The dose for the pediatric vaccine is one-third that of adults. In fact, when we did studies, we saw significantly fewer side effects, such as arm pain or fever or a feeling a little tired. When you compare that to actually having the disease itself, again, the benefits far outweigh the risks you might see.” Ketyer says the way all vaccines work is that if there are complications , they occur in the first few weeks, not years.” The vaccine is proven safe, proven effective More than 430 million doses have been given in the United States so far, with known mild side effects such as swelling of the arms, low-grade fever, a little fatigue, headache And there are very few reports of more serious longer-term complications as a result of the vaccine,” says Ketyer id. Both doctors compare the low risk of side effects from the vaccine with the known dangers of COVID-19. They say that if parents have questions, they should discuss things with the family’s pediatrician.

Pittsburgh’s Action News 4 spoke with pediatricians from both UPMC and AHN about questions parents of 5- to 11-year-olds may have about vaccinating their children to protect them from COVID-19.

Watch the full report in the video player above.

As to whether they should consider getting their kids vaccinated at a school clinic, other clinics, a pharmacy, or their pediatrician’s office, the doctors we spoke to will help them get the vaccine in the environment that works best for you.

“Depending on the site, there is definitely availability. You just have to try and watch, make those calls. I’d say, on average we’ll be away for maybe a week or ten days, maybe (for) your ideal location. But if you look, its there are already appointments this weekend,” said Dr. Pamela Schoemer, director of safety, quality, and outcomes for UPMC Children’s Community Pediatrics.

dr. Ned Ketyer, an AHN pediatrician, said: “If parents have paid close attention and they feel comfortable giving their child the vaccine in any setting, they should. I have to say that most parents are most comfortable like to go to their pediatrician’s office to have pictures taken of their children. We understand it’s a familiar place with familiar faces and kids seem to be doing better and parents are more comfortable with that.”

The doctors we spoke to addressed questions about vaccine dosing that some parents may ask. What about kids who are big for their age or whose birthdays may soon place them outside the 5 to 11 age group?

Ketyer said: “I understand why parents would ask that question, but the vaccine isn’t based on a person’s weight. It’s based on a person’s age and their ability to mount an immune response as a result of getting a vaccine. And that’s age related, not weight related I got that question about 11 year olds about to turn 12: “Should I wait for the vaccine?” The answer is no. If you have the chance to get the vaccine, make sure your child gets the vaccine.”

Schoemer said, “We’re following the data and the way it’s been studied. It’s really based on age, not size. Our immune system doesn’t respond based on our size, so we’re going by age. So, if you have an 11 If you are a year old, you should get an 11-year vaccine (dose) and not wait until after your birthday, because the sooner you are vaccinated, the sooner you are protected.”

A poll by the Kaiser Family Foundation spoke to parents of 5-to-11-year-olds. Those who are hesitant about the COVID-19 vaccine to protect their children worry about balancing safety and fear of longer-term risks.

Schoemer said: “With this, the benefits far outweigh the risks. The dose for the pediatric vaccine is one-third that of adults. When we did studies, we actually saw significantly lower – even side effects, such as arm pain or fever.” or feeling a little tired. If you compare that to having the disease itself, again, the benefits far outweigh the risks you might see.”

Ketyer says the way all vaccines work is that if there are complications, they happen in the first few weeks, not years.

“The vaccine is safe and proven effective. More than 430 million doses have been given in the United States to date, with known mild side effects such as swelling of the arms, mild fever, a little fatigue, headache. And there are very few reports of more serious longer-term complications from the vaccine,” Ketyer said.

Both doctors compare the low risk of side effects from the vaccine with the known dangers of COVID-19. They say that if parents have questions, they should discuss things with the family pediatrician.

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